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Inside3DP Exclusive: Stratasys vs. 3D Systems - A Peek at Web Traffic Data

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on Jun 17 2014 , 10:07:56
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@ShaniePhillips1

Everyone who’s anyone in the industry knows Stratasys and 3D Systems are the two heavyweights to watch in the 3D printing arena. If you’ve dug a little further, especially if you’re interested in investing, you’ll know the publicly released financial earnings stats for the two companies.

But what about more enlightening data? Data that isn’t as widely known and could potentially affect the futures of these printing giants?

Inside3DP had access to credible site analysis sources that provided us with some eye-opening details about the web analytics of Stratasys and 3D Systems. This has given us exclusive insight into potential things to come.

Here’s the basic low-down.

We compared website traffic between Stratasys.com and 3DSystems.com over a 12-month period: June 2013 – May 2014.

In that time:

Stratasys had around 5.9 million visits and 3D Systems had around 5.3 million. It seems like Stratasys.com is more popular…but lets take a closer look.

  • In the month of June 2013, Stratasys.com had about 417,000 visits whereas 3D systems had approx. 143,000. Stratasys continued to have more visits to its site every month from June to December 2013
  • However, in December the amount of visitors for the two sites came extremely close. Stratasys had around 485,000 visits and 3D Systems had around 463,000
  • Since then, 3D systems took over the top spot and constantly stayed above Stratasys. Last month in May 2014, Stratasys had around 510,000 visitors and 3D systems had a significant 670,000

3D Systems visitors showed more interest in 3DSystems.com than Stratasys visitors did with Stratasys.com. The following info reveals what kind of traffic the two companies attract.

  • Stratasys.com visitors stayed on the site for just under 3 minutes.  3D Systems.com visitors stayed on the site for almost 6 minutes at a time
  • Most of the traffic for both sites came from search engines. This means most of their traffic came from visitors inputting the search terms ‘Stratasys’, ‘3D Systems’ or other related terms such as ‘3D printers’ into Google and other search engines and finding the companies’ websites
  • However, direct traffic was the second highest source for both companies. Direct traffic comes from visitors directly typing in the URL’s – meaning they knew exactly what they were looking for and had most likely been to the sites before
  • Almost 25% of 3D Systems’ traffic in this period was direct, whereas only 17% of Stratasys traffic was direct

Geography

Location-wise around 50% of both Stratasys and 3D Systems visitors were from the US. Their traffic share by country was fairly similar, with the largest significant discrepancy being that the ratio of UK visitors to Stratasys and 3D Systems was around 2:1 respectively.

ALSO: In a compilation of audience interests (categories of other sites browsed frequently by each site’s visitors) Stratasys visitors were mostly interested in Business and Industry. 3D Systems visitors were mostly interested in Science and Technology.

To sum up

It seems as if Stratasys visitors are more interested in the financial and business aspects of the company. Perhaps as the company seems to be doing a bit better financially (according to publically released Q1 results) people worldwide are looking to invest in them over 3D Systems.

3D Systems’ visitors on the other hand tend to be more interested in the products and services the company has to offer. More interested in general even, considering the average time spent browsing the site. This makes sense considering 3D Systems has been increasing its R&D spending and sparking widely discussed partnerships with other companies like Hershey and Hasbro.

Let’s not forget that Stratasys owns MakerBot, which has its own separate site. This could also explain why Stratasys visitors seem less interested in the company’s products and services – the majority of Stratasys’ products and services creating major headlines in typical non-industry-insider, consumer sites these days belong to MakerBot, meaning they’d direct visitors to MakerBot.com instead.

If MakerBot.com is analyzed too the results could portray a different image. Stay posted to Inside3DP this week and you just may see what we’re talking about.

Shanie Phillips is a senior contributor and editor at Inside3DP.com. Originally from the UK, Shanie has also spent many years based in Singapore, the US and now Israel. In addition to writing for Inside3DP she also has work published on several other news and innovation sites. Drop her a line at shanie@inside3dp.com.

3D Printing Industry
Stratasys
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